New Orleans All The Way Live - Music, Food, Culture

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"Boogie at Midnight"

King James & The Special Men at BJ's Lounge. Photo by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee.
King James & The Special Men at BJ's Lounge. Photo by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee.
Part 1:

Part 2:


This week’s show features two sides of Rock and Roll.

The 1950’s was a special time in the history of Rock and Roll in New Orleans. Fats Domino had only one person who sold more records than he did in the 50’s and that was a man by the name of Elvis Presley.

Fortunately, the iconic New Orleans rock and roll sound of 1950s still has a place every Monday night. BJ’s Lounge is a windowless bar on the far side of the Bywater neighborhood. On Mondays King James & The Special Men hold down a regular gig where the pool table is shoved to the side, and the homemade Red Beans are by the band waiting to be served while the dancers crowd the floor.

The second side of Rock and Roll features Southern Rock troubadour Grayson Capps and the Lost Cause Minstrels, recorded live at French Quarter Fest 2012.


In case you missed Jimmy Horn's description of how he prepares his red beans on air, here's the recap:

"A step in bean making that  a lot of folks skip nowadays is the sofrito. These beans have been cooking already, alright, for probably about three hours. Slow! Not a hard boil. Bring em to a hard, then bring it right back down. Slow cook 'em for maybe six and a half hours. Not until they get tender do I put my seasoning. I got my smoked meat, my neck bones, and my bay leaves. That's it. Then over here I've got some rendered bacon fat, some sausage. A traditional mirepoix is celery, carrots and onions. Then over here it got turned with the mixture of the Spanish, they use the green pepper instead of the celery, and they don't use the carrots, they use parsley. But it's still just an aromatic base with garlic and onions. In New Orleans they call it The Trinity. They lost the word sofrito, or mirepoix. The Spanish called it sofrito. The bottom line is you cook you onions and you render your meat. If you look at a Camellia beans wrapper, it tells you right on there "render your meat!" and then cook your beans in the fat."

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